Photography

10 smartphone camera tips for wildlife photography beginners – The Natural History Museum

Summary

5. Do not disturb

‘Do no harm’ is at the heart of being a wildlife photographer. Always keep a safe distance from a wild animal and do not seek out any interaction with them. Be careful not to disturb them or alter their behaviour or habitat, and do not disrupt them when they’re eating or resting.

Roz Kidman Cox, editor, and Chair of the Jury, says, ‘Indeed, if the judges pick up on the slightest sign that an animal may have been moved, disturbed or distressed in some way …….

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5. Do not disturb

‘Do no harm’ is at the heart of being a wildlife photographer. Always keep a safe distance from a wild animal and do not seek out any interaction with them. Be careful not to disturb them or alter their behaviour or habitat, and do not disrupt them when they’re eating or resting.

Roz Kidman Cox, editor, and Chair of the Jury, says, ‘Indeed, if the judges pick up on the slightest sign that an animal may have been moved, disturbed or distressed in some way by the photographer, or if its behaviour has been affected, that picture goes out of the competition.’

Turn off the sound on your phone to avoid startling any animals and move slowly so you do not end up chasing them away.

6. Consider composition

‘Fresh and original images are what the judges look for. That means not just unusual or uncommon subjects but original angles on familiar subjects,’ says Roz.

The well-known ‘rule of thirds’ can help with the composition of your images. Check if you can turn on grid settings on your phone’s camera, and if not, try to keep the rule of thirds in mind. Divide your image into three equal sections from top to bottom, and side to side, so that there would be nine smaller blocks in a grid. For a more balanced image, try to place your subject where these lines intersect.  

Like this year’s Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year, Vidyun R Hebbar, be creative and think about what is in the background of your image. Is there something interesting to include, or something distracting to avoid? Could some foliage make the perfect frame, or is there a pattern that you can play with?

Jordi Chias, underwater photographer and former jury member, says, ‘People think you need to go to remote places and photograph “difficult to see” animals or “close to extinction” subjects, but I really like when someone shows us a common subject in a different and original way.’

One trick to help with your background is to lie on the on the ground to have more foreground. This can also draw attention to your subject and create powerful eye contact.

Source: https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/10-smartphone-camera-tips-for-wildlife-photography-beginners.html